Three Countries, Six More Churches

Last Sunday’s post,”Five Countries, Five Churches” got a fair amount of appreciation, and I thought since it is Sunday I might once again post a photo essay of sorts of some of the churches we visited on our travels in Europe this past summer.

St. Martin in the Fields Church, London

St. Martin in the Fields Church, London

Whipping Post, 1572, St. Martin-in-the-Fields Church, London.

Whipping Post, 1572, St. Martin-in-the-Fields Church, London.

In the crypt, which now houses a cafe among other things,  St. Martin-in-the-Fields Church, London.

In the crypt, which now houses a cafe among other things, St. Martin-in-the-Fields Church, London.

We’ll start with the church of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, located on Trafalgar Square in London. I guess there were fields in the area at some point, but I suspect not for the past couple of centuries.Then again, there has been a Christian church in this site for a long time. This church entered popular culture when the soundtrack album to the 1980s movie Amadeus featured its orchestra. In my family the church was already known before that: my great-great grandparents were married here (at least I think that was who it was).

I hadn’t known that bit of family history when I was last in Trafalgar Square, in 1981, so didn’t go into the church then. This year I made sure we went inside.

Anglican churches are not as elaborate as the Roman Catholic or Orthodox ones we visited on the continent, but there was still a beauty to the sanctuary. It was an interesting visit, especially the whipping post in the basement that was once in the square outside the church.

All Saints Pavement is a fourteenth century parish church in York. I don’t think Vivian saw this one, she was either shopping or napping and I was exploring on my own. It was hot in the sunshine, and the sign on the church wall said to “come in to look, to think, to pray a while and may God bless you,” so I did.

All Saints Pavement Church, York.

The altar, All Saints Pavement Church, York.

The West Window (circa 1370), All Saints Pavement Church, York.

The West Window (circa 1370), All Saints Pavement Church, York.

All Saints Pavement Church, York.

All Saints Pavement Church, York.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

St. Mary's Abbey, York.

St. Mary’s Abbey, York.

The remains of St. Mary’s Abbey are on the grounds of the Yorkshire Museum in York. There’s not much left of what was once the richest abbey in England, just a few walls that make great pictures. The ruins are not from the original building but from a 13th century reconstruction.When Henry VIII had his dispute with Pope Clement VII that led to the founding of the church of England the Abbey was closed, abandoned and over the years destroyed.

St. Mary's Abbey, York.

St. Mary’s Abbey, York.

St. Mary's Abbey, York.

St. Mary’s Abbey, York.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Westminster Cathedral

Westminster Cathedral

Westminster Cathedral

Westminster Cathedral

Westminster Cathedral

Westminster Cathedral

 

 

 

 

 

 

We didn’t go into Westminster Cathedral during our afternoon walking around downtown London. I can’t remember why – probably we were just too tired and we had a train to catch. I’ve been to Westminster Abbey a couple of times in the past, but never to this Roman Catholic church which I gather is frequently confused with its more famous cousin.

It’s been more than 40 years since I took Latin in high school, but the inscription over the door is an easy one to translate: Lord Jesus, King and Redeemer, save us by Your blood.

 

 

 

 

 

St. Patrokoli Church, Soest, Germany.

St. Patrokoli Church, Soest, Germany.

St. Patrokoli Church.

St. Patrokoli Church.

St. Patrokoli Church.

St. Patrokoli Church.

 

 

 

 

 

 

St. Patrokoli is one of the churches we visited during our day in Soest, Germany. I tend to automatically think of German churches as Lutheran, although I know intellectually that the Protestant Reformation was not universally accepted.

It gave me a real sense of history when I realized that the building goes back a millennia (the oldest part anyway).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bucharest is a city of churches. We couldn’t possibly see inside all of them. In our three days in the city we really couldn’t see all the interesting ones, not if we were going to take in any of the other sites of interest while we were there. So I compromised – I took some exterior pictures and promised myself that when we return these particular churches will be high on the list.

The Assumption of the Virgin Mary, Kretluescu Church.

The Assumption of the Virgin Mary, Kretluescu Church.

The Assumption of the Virgin Mary, Kretluescu Church.

The Assumption of the Virgin Mary, Kretluescu Church.

The Assumption of the Virgin Mary, Kretluescu Church.

The Assumption of the Virgin Mary, Kretluescu Church.

The Assumption of the Virgin Mary, Kretluescu Church was only a block or so from our hotel. We walked past it pretty much every time we went anywhere. What stood out for me was the design and the frescoes in the porch.

 

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