The God We Choose

One sign that we are maturing is when we find ourselves believing in a God we don’t always like – Luke Norsworthy.

It’s a pleasant feeling to finish a book and know you want to read it again. Especially a book about how God doesn’t live up to your expectations.

Have trouble believing in a good God when there is so much suffering on the world? Feel that God has let you down? Don’t buy the idea of a cosmic Santa Claus? You are not alone.

For someone to have doubts about God’s goodness, or even His existence, isn’t rare. When the doubter is a Christian pastor, that makes it more problematic. When faith is your job, what happens when you wonder if you should believe?

In God Over Good, Luke Norsworthy is honest about his doubts, about his struggles with simplified Christianity. He asks hard questions and rejects the pat answers many people give.

I’m a questions guy. I always want to know “why,” plus who, what, where and when. Maybe even “how” – although if you ask the “5Ws” that will usually encompass the how. That is probably one of the reasons I became a journalist, something I still consider myself to be even though it has been more than 20 years since I last had to meet a newspaper deadline.

When it comes to matters of God and theology I also like to ask why. Like Norsworthy, I am uncomfortable with cookie cutter answers that in some ways seem to avoid the real issues. My faith isn’t real if I shrink from examining my beliefs. There are times I don’t understand, times I just don’t know – but trying to pretend there aren’t hard questions isn’t an option.51w3YTku1OL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_ norsworthy.jpg

God Over Good is a fun read in many ways, despite the serious topic. As the story unfolded, I wasn’t surprised to discover Norsworthy has tried his hand at stand-up comedy. He understands the need to inject humour into a weighty subject to avoid depressing the reader. I appreciated that.

This is a book for those who are not satisfied with God, who are asking uncomfortable questions – uncomfortable at least for those who don’t like to have their faith challenged. This volume is for anyone who has seen the world as it is and doesn’t like the simple “it is God’s will” answers.

As with Job, who challenged God to explain himself, you may not like what you read. God Over Good provides honest answers to some tough questions – but they may not be the ones you wanted to hear. They weren’t for Luke Norsworthy, but he has learned to live with that and embrace the questions.

Perhaps we all should.

“Book has been provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc.”

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One comment

  1. imaginarywoman · · Reply

    Great post!

    On Tue, Dec 11, 2018 at 12:07 PM random thoughts from lorne wrote:

    > Lorne Anderson posted: “https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XNewoPVdD4Q One > sign that we are maturing is when we find ourselves believing in a God we > don’t always like – Luke Norsworthy. It’s a pleasant feeling to finish a > book and know you want to read it again. Especially a book” >

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